Stripe has been granted a patent for a method that allows an electronic device to synchronize with a live sporting event broadcast and obtain supplemental sports data from a server. The data can include instant replay videos with audio, score updates, and a football widget providing game status updates. The method involves receiving a notification from a second electronic device, accessing the supplemental content from a server, and transmitting it to the second device for synchronization with the first device. GlobalData’s report on Stripe gives a 360-degree view of the company including its patenting strategy. Buy the report here.

According to GlobalData’s company profile on Stripe, Rebate eligibility processing was a key innovation area identified from patents. Stripe's grant share as of September 2023 was 59%. Grant share is based on the ratio of number of grants to total number of patents.

Synchronizing supplemental content with live sporting event broadcasts

Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Credit: Stripe Inc

A recently granted patent (Publication Number: US11778138B2) describes a method for synchronizing content rendered by two electronic devices. The method involves a server computer system receiving a notification from a second electronic device when it detects a triggering activity while the first electronic device is rendering content. The server then accesses supplemental content associated with the first content from a content database and transmits it to the second device, causing it to synchronize with the first device by rendering the supplemental content during the same time period.

The patent claims also mention that at least a portion of the supplemental content can be advertisement content associated with the first content. This means that while the first device is rendering content, the second device can display relevant advertisements alongside it. The first content can be streaming media or a website, and the advertisement content is transmitted to the second device over a data network.

The synchronization between the devices is achieved through the detection of synchronization tags. The second device detects these tags generated by the first device during the rendering of the first content and sends a notification to the server computer system. In response, the server accesses supplemental content associated with the detected tags and transmits it to the second device for rendering while the first content is being displayed.

The patent also mentions the use of location data for synchronization. The server computer system can receive location data from the second device and access location-based supplemental content associated with the first content and the location data. This location-based content is then transmitted to the second device to synchronize its rendering with the first device.

Overall, this patent describes a method for synchronizing content between two electronic devices, allowing for the display of supplemental content, such as advertisements, alongside the main content. The synchronization is achieved through the detection of synchronization tags and can also be based on location data. This technology has the potential to enhance the user experience by providing additional relevant information or promotional content while consuming media or browsing websites.

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GlobalData Patent Analytics tracks bibliographic data, legal events data, point in time patent ownerships, and backward and forward citations from global patenting offices. Textual analysis and official patent classifications are used to group patents into key thematic areas and link them to specific companies across the world’s largest industries.