Vishay Intertechnology has filed a patent for devices, methods, and systems for detecting proximity. The patent describes a proximity sensor that includes two light emitters and a light detector. The first light emitter emits light while the light detector is not sensing, and the second light emitter emits light while the light detector is sensing. The patent also mentions different implementations where the first light emitter directly illuminates the light detector, and the second light emitter is obstructed from directly illuminating the light detector. The goal is to maintain a linear responsivity of the light detector. GlobalData’s report on Vishay Intertechnology gives a 360-degree view of the company including its patenting strategy. Buy the report here.

According to GlobalData’s company profile on Vishay Intertechnology, 3D memory devices was a key innovation area identified from patents. Vishay Intertechnology's grant share as of September 2023 was 56%. Grant share is based on the ratio of number of grants to total number of patents.

Proximity sensor with dual light emitters and detector

Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Credit: Vishay Intertechnology Inc

A recently filed patent (Publication Number: US20230243999A1) describes a proximity sensor that includes a first light emitter, a second light emitter, and a light detector. The first light emitter is designed to emit light for a specific time period while the light detector is not sensing, while the second light emitter emits light during a different time period while the light detector is sensing.

The proximity sensor also includes a housing that allows direct illumination of the light detector by the first light emitter, but obstructs direct illumination of the light detector by the second light emitter. This design ensures that the light detector receives light only from the desired emitter during the appropriate time period.

Additionally, the housing obstructs the illumination of a display by the first light emitter and also obstructs direct illumination of the light detector by the second light emitter. This prevents any interference or unwanted illumination during the sensing process.

The first light emitter is configured to emit light in a way that maintains a linear responsivity of the light detector during the second time period. This ensures accurate and consistent proximity sensing.

The light detector in the proximity sensor can be a photodiode or phototransistor, which are commonly used components for light detection.

Both the first and second light emitters in the proximity sensor are light emitting diodes (LEDs). LEDs are known for their efficiency and reliability, making them suitable for this application.

The light emitted by the proximity sensor is specified to be infrared light. Infrared light is commonly used in proximity sensing due to its ability to accurately detect objects without being affected by ambient light.

In summary, the patent describes a proximity sensor that utilizes two light emitters and a light detector to accurately sense proximity. The design includes a housing that ensures proper illumination of the light detector and prevents interference with a display. The sensor is designed to maintain a linear responsivity of the light detector and uses infrared light for accurate proximity detection.

To know more about GlobalData’s detailed insights on Vishay Intertechnology, buy the report here.

Premium Insights

From

The gold standard of business intelligence.

Blending expert knowledge with cutting-edge technology, GlobalData’s unrivalled proprietary data will enable you to decode what’s happening in your market. You can make better informed decisions and gain a future-proof advantage over your competitors.

GlobalData

GlobalData, the leading provider of industry intelligence, provided the underlying data, research, and analysis used to produce this article.

GlobalData Patent Analytics tracks bibliographic data, legal events data, point in time patent ownerships, and backward and forward citations from global patenting offices. Textual analysis and official patent classifications are used to group patents into key thematic areas and link them to specific companies across the world’s largest industries.