London now exceeds World Health Organization (WHO) quotas for air pollution levels according to the city’s mayor Sadiq Khan.

While London came in 1,389 for air pollution levels of the 3000 cities and towns tracked by WHO annually, recent media attention is raising awareness among the public.

According to WHO, exposure to these harmful air pollution particles also known as PM2.5 have been linked to heart and lung disease, with long term exposure even potentially impacting cognitive function and even causing diabetes.

The number of people concerned about the impact of pollution on their health and appearance was generally high in emerging markets such as Indonesia, Colombia, Peru, and India, according to GlobalData research.

This is unsurprising given that these regions are home to some of the most (air) polluted countries globally.

In comparison, just 35 percent of people in the UK shared this sentiment in the same research.

Nevertheless, the growing air pollution crisis faced in the UK capital could serve to stimulate demand and create new opportunities for products which can protect from pollution.

The health and beauty sector is addressing this growing concern with new product launches that specifically combat pollution in urban areas.

A trend originating from the pollution concerned markets of the Far East – recognition that PM2.5 particles can damage more than personal health and contribute to ageing and unhealthy skin has served to inspire a wave of so-called anti-pollution beauty products.

Interest in beauty trends and the innovative nature of offerings from this region, combined with heightened levels of both pollution and awareness of it in Europe, and indeed London, means that these are becoming increasingly relevant.

As awareness of pollution and impact on the appearance grows, there is potential for such skincare treatments to become as common as sun protection.