3 THINGS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD TODAY

Good morning, here’s your Thursday morning briefing to set you up for the day ahead. Look out for these three things happening around the world today.

Experts consider China’s economic future

Experts from the world of politics and academia will today meet in London to discuss the economic future of China and its potential impact on the rest of the world.

The event, entitled China’s Economic Future: Emerging challenges at home and abroad, will include a host of high-profile speakers, including an opening address from Kevin Rudd, former Prime Minister of Australia and president of the Asia Society Policy Institute.

Other speakers include Sir Vince Cable, leader of the Liberal Democrats; Fu Chengyu, former chairman of the Sinopec Group; Sir Christopher Pissarides, Regius Professor of Economics at London School of Economics and Political Science and Jeongmin Seong, Senior Fellow at McKinsey Global Institute.

Key focuses for the event will include challenges facing China as it pursues economic reform; the country’s approach to global diplomacy; how replicable the country’s development model is and the growing role of technology in the country’s manufacturing industry.

The event will begin at 9:30am London time at Chatham House.

Female FTSE Index unveiled

Cranfield University’s Cranfield School of Management will today release its yearly Female FTSE Index, which charts the number of women executive directors on the boards of FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 companies.

The index, which has been running since 1999, is considered a key measure of the level of female participation in senior management in UK businesses.

The Female FTSE Board Report 2019 will be published at 11am London time, and will be accompanied by the yearly 100 Women to Watch report.

Post-Brexit farming in the spotlight

The Centre for Food Policy’s Food Research Collaboration will today publish a report into farming in the UK post-Brexit.

The report, which is developed by researchers at the University of Sussex, argues that the country should take the opportunity to adopt sustainable farming initiatives as a core part of its post-Brexit food policy, including a greater focus on encouraging UK citizens to grow their own food.

It also raises the issue of declining wildlife in the UK, arguing that without sustainable farming the UK would see further drops in wildlife and be exposed to greater risks of food shortages.

3 Things That Will Change the World Today

Wednesday’s Highlights

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Off-grid solar is Africa’s best hope for prosperity – but business must take the lead

5G in retail: On-the-go revolution unlikely to happen, research finds

The Bank of Amazon: How big tech is disrupting banking