3 THINGS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD TODAY

Good morning, here’s your Thursday morning briefing to set you up for the day ahead. Look out for these three things happening around the world today.

NSO Group spyware court hearing

A judge at Tel Aviv’s District Court will today hear arguments brought against NSO Group, an Israeli company that develops spyware technology.

The firm made headlines last summer after it emerged its Pegasus software could take over a smartphone via a WhatsApp voice call – without the user having to answer.

Amnesty International is calling on Israel’s Ministry of Defense to restrict the activities of NSO Group, whose software has allegedly been used to target human rights activists, journalists and lawyers.

Facebook, which owns WhatsApp, filed a separate lawsuit against NSO Group last October.

Does artificial intelligence need more regulation?

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Fortune announces “world’s most admired companies”

Financial magazine Fortune publishes the latest annual edition of the world’s “most admired” companies.

The list surveys thousands of executives, analysts, directors and experts to establish the companies with the best corporate reputations.

Last year the top ten was dominated by tech firms. Apple and Amazon topped the list, with Microsoft, Alphabet and Netflix also featuring.

Morgan Stanley posts Q4 financial results

Investment bank Morgan Stanley is set to post its fourth-quarter financial results for 2019, with analysts forecasting a revenue climb of 11% to $9.52bn.

The firm is a key player when it comes to underwriting initial public offerings for technology firms.

Last year it was involved with Uber’s disappointing IPO and it is set to play a leading role in Airbnb’s expected IPO this year.

Wednesday’s Highlights

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Exclusive: Production company data breach exposes personal data of Dove ‘real people’ ad participants

3 Things That Will Change the World Today

With its acquisition of Pointy, Google is expanding search into the physical world

WEF president: Climate crisis inaction like “moving around deckchairs on the Titanic”