These three things will change the world today.

1. Muslim ban take two

US president Donald Trump is expected to sign a revised executive order later today, temporarily barring the entry of people from certain Muslim-majority countries and halting the nation’s refugee program.

Trump’s original order temporarily blocked citizens of Iran, Iraq, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen, Syria and Libya from coming to the US and put on hold the US refugee program.

The new order is expected to remove Iraq from the list of countries whose citizens face a temporary US travel ban for 90 days following pressure from the Pentagon and State Department.

US authorities cited Iraq’s key role in fighting the Islamic State group.

Trump signed his original executive order in late January, and was blocked at the beginning of February.

2. Fillion clings on

Francis Fillon, the French presidential hopeful delivered a defiant speech to thousands of grassroots supporters in central Paris on Sunday.

Fillion, who has been mired in a scandal surrounding hundreds of thousands of euros of public money he paid his wife to be his parliamentary assistant in still vying for support.

Speaking on France 2 television’s evening news, Fillon was asked directly whether he would stand down.

“The answer is no,” he said. “I see no reason to do that. It would lead to a dead end for my political family.”

Christian Estrosi, Valerie Pecresse and Xavier Bertrand, who run three of the country’s largest regions, will meet Fillon later today to discuss the future of his campaign.

Alain Juppe, the French politician widely tipped to replace Fillon, has ruled out standing as a candidate in the scandal-hit election race, plunging the party into fresh chaos.

3 Things That Will Change the World Today

Estrosi has wanted Juppe to take over from Fillon.

3. Malaysia expels North Korea’s envoy

Authorities in Malaysia, declared ambassador Kang Choi “persona non grata” over the weekend over the assassination of the half-brother of the North Korean leader.

Kim Jong-nam was poisoned on 13 February with deadly nerve agent VX and Kang strongly criticised the investigation into his murder.

The Malaysian foreign ministry said the expulsion was “part of the process by the Malaysian government to review its relations” with North Korea.

“Malaysia will react strongly against any insults made against it or any attempt to tarnish its reputation,” Malaysia’s foreign minister, Anifah Haji Aman said in a statement released late on Saturday.