The England national team have returned home heroes after taking the nation to their first World Cup semi-final in over 25 years, but how has each member of the England squad benefited from their extended stay in Russia?

England’s stars have seen their transfer values skyrocket following their successful World Cup campaign. Harry Maguire’s value had doubled to £50m, while Tottenham can demand an additional £25m for Harry Kane this summer according to Sky Sports.

Clubs are undoubtedly set to profit. However, data shows that the best-performing members of the England squad will also see their personal brand values rocket thanks to their World Cup run.

Using data provided by athlete index platform Brandtix, Verdict has calculated how much the World Cup boosted the brand value of each of England’s 23 players.

This data is calculated based on player performance data and social media sentiment, which offers an idea of how a player is performing on the pitch and how well that is being received by fans. Estimates player values have been taken from football statistics tracker Transfermarkt.

We have looked at the value of each player ahead of each game, as well as at the end of the tournament, to provide an insight into how much each athlete had benefited from the exposure of competing on the biggest stage in football.


Harry Kane – Tottenham Hotspur – +21%

If Real Madrid are on the lookout for a big name to fill the boots left behind by Cristiano Ronaldo, Kane will undoubtedly be among the contenders, having seen his profile grow considerably in Russia.

Six goals in six games landed the England captain the Golden Boot award, which saw his brand value hit a new peak following France’s final victory over Croatia. Even if he couldn’t carry England all the way, Kane proved that he could perform on the biggest of stages.

Aged 24, Kane still has a long future ahead of him and will undoubtedly see his brand value continue to grow over the coming years, especially if a switch to the Spanish capital is on the cards.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£135m 527 638 +21% 638 (+21%)

Harry Kane value - Verdict


Jordan Pickford – Everton – +3%

Pickford earned his place among England’s World Cup heroes after helping the team to their first penalty shootout victory in World Cup history. Following up that win over Colombia with a clean sheet over Sweden, Pickford’s value peaked at 35.1% higher than it was at the start of the tournament.

However, an extra-time defeat against Croatia, followed by a lacklustre showing against Belgium in the third-place playoff, brought Pickford’s value back down by around 32%.

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Pickford finished the tournament with a single clean sheet and eight goals conceded in seven appearances.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£27m 390 400 +3% 527 (+35%)

Jordan Pickford value - Verdict


Jesse Lingard – Manchester United – +3%

A curled shot into the top corner from outside of the box was Lingard’s best moment in Russia. It may have come against minnows Panama, but it was still a contender for goal of the tournament.

He wasn’t able to produce anything better as the tournament went on, and that shows in his value changes throughout the tournament. However, he was still one of few to come out of the back-to-back defeats against Croatia and Belgium with an increased value.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£31.5m 398 408 +3% 523 (+31%)

Jesse Lingard value - Verdict


Kieran Trippier – Tottenham Hotspur – +1%

Trippier was one of the standout performers during England’s run, providing plenty of attacking threat down the wings throughout that will have undoubtedly made him one to watch for some of the biggest clubs in Europe during the remainder of the summer transfer window.

Football fans are suckers for tears (it’s what made us fall in love with James Rodriguez at the 2014 World Cup) and it certainly did Trippier no harm as he shed a few while leaving the pitch injured as England’s World Cup dream came to an end. Trippier’s value peaked following the Croatia defeat, but was brought back down following a second defeat to Belgium.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£18m 375 380 +1% 507 (+35%)

Kieran Trippier value - Verdict


Kyle Walker – Manchester City – +1%

Southgate used right-back Walker as part of his three-man defence, with the Manchester City defender used out of position as a centre back. Despite not always looking comfortable, Walker made the cut in five of England’s seven matches.

After helping to keep a clean sheet against Sweden, Walker’s brand value climbed to 11% above his starting value and stayed up despite England failing to make the final.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£45m 387 392 +1% 430 (+11%)

Kyle Walker value - Verdict


John Stones – Manchester City – +1%

With two goals in the 6-1 thrashing of Panama, Stones saw his brand value peak at 22% above his starting value heading into the final group game against Belgium. However, defeat to brought that crashing back down to pre-World Cup values.

Stones put in some solid performances in Russia, but ultimately not enough to raise his value long term.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£45m 376 379 +1% 459 (+22%)

John Stones value - Verdict


Harry Maguire – Leicester City – +1%

Maguire was picked out alongside Pickford and Kieran Trippier as the breakthrough acts in Russia. One of few to have played in all seven of England’s games, this shows just how integral Maguire was to Southgate’s side.

A goal in the 2-0 victory over Sweden to send England through to their first semi-final since 1990 saw Maguire’s value peak. However, back-to-back defeats brought an abrupt end to Maguire’s growth.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£22.5m 387 389 +1% 526 (+36%)

Harry Maguire value - Verdict


Raheem Sterling – Manchester City – 0%

Despite Sterling’s shortage of luck in front of goal, Southgate kept faith in the Manchester City winger as Kane’s partner up front throughout the tournament. He caused problems for the opposition and created chances for his teammates, but was unable to score a goal.

He wasn’t bad, but he wasn’t great either, and that reflects in his steady value throughout the tournament.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£81m 447 444 0% 479 (+7%)

Dele Alli – Tottenham Hotspur – 0%

Alli spent most of the group stage injured and was unable to return in time for the Colombia game. However, after scoring on his return in the convincing 2-0 victory over Sweden, Alli’s value spiked as fans and brands started dreaming of an England World Cup win. Back-to-back defeats meant that this was short-lived.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£90m 417 417 0% 493 (+18%)

Dele Alli value - Verdict


Eric Dier – Tottenham Hotspur – 0%

Southgate made a big call by leaving Dier, a mainstay in the Euro 2016 team, out of his starting lineup. He is certainly one of England’s better players, but there was no room for him alongside Jordan Henderson, Jesse Lingard and Dele Alli in midfield.

Dier did appear in six out of seven of England’s games and he scored the deciding goal in England’s penalty shootout victory over Colombia. However, four of those appearances were off of the bench. Ultimately, a lack of minutes made little impact on Dier’s brand value.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£36m 403 402 0% 423 (+5%)

Marcus Rashford – Manchester United – 0%

Rashford was unfortunate not to be given more time on the pitch, given Sterling’s inability to score goals. However, he was mostly limited to substitute appearances and wasn’t given the time to make a significant impact on the tournament. His brand value remained largely unchanged throughout.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£58.5m 402 403 0% 431 (+7%)

Ruben Loftus-Cheek – Chelsea – 0%

Despite his young age and limited experience at this level, Loftus-Cheek did well to fill in for the injured Dele Alli to see England safely through to the knockout rounds. His value peaked after he was handed a starting spot against Panama. However, he didn’t do quite enough to impact his value long-term.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£13.5m 368 369 0% 402 (+9%)

Jamie Vardy – Leicester City – 0%

Vardy was a mainstay in the England team that disappointed at Euro 2016, but the 31-year-old lost his place to England’s young, emerging stars ahead of the 2018 World Cup. He made four appearances, but most of his time in Russia was spent on the bench. His value increased following the win over Colombia, but he didn’t do enough to impact his value long-term.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£18m 381 380 0% 401 (+5%)

Danny Welbeck – Arsenal – 0%

Welbeck spent just 11 minutes on the pitch in Russia and was unable to do enough to impact his brand value.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£13.5m 361 360 0% 372 (+3%)

Fabian Delph – Manchester City – 0%

Despite his role in Pep Guardiola’s Premier League winning Manchester City side, Delph was unable to displace Alli, Lingard and Loftus-Cheek as Southgate’s preferred midfield options. He was limited to substitute appearances throughout and, subsequently, the World Cup has little impact on his brand value.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£13.5m 371 371 0% 375 (+1%)

Trent Alexander-Arnold – Liverpool – 0%

Alexander-Arnold made his competitive England debut during the 1-0 defeat to Belgium in the group stages. However, he was unable to put in enough of a performance to displace Trippier down the right. Despite a slight increase during following the Belgium game, his brand value remained largely unchanged throughout.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£22.5m 376 376 0% 482 (0%)

Jack Butland – Stoke City – 0%

Butland failed to make an appearance at Russia 2018. His brand value remained unchanged throughout.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£19.8m 412 412 0% 412 (0%)

Nick Pope – Burnley– 0%

Pope failed to make an appearance at Russia 2018. His brand value remained unchanged throughout.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£9m 233 233 0% 234 (0%)

Jordan Henderson – Liverpool – -1%

Losing the captain’s armband to Harry Kane likely did Henderson’s brand value some damage heading into the tournament. However, he continued to command from the middle of the pitch throughout the tournament in key games against Panama, Colombia and Sweden.

There were few surprises from the Liverpool captain, which did little to increase his brand value, but consistency is exactly what we have come to expect from him.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£22.5m 392 388 -1% 424 (+8%)

Phil Jones – Manchester United – -1%

Jones wasn’t part of Southgate’s starting eleven, but he did play a part in both of England’s games against Belgium. Despite seeing his value peak slightly following his 90 minutes showing against Belgium in the 1-0 group stage defeat, Jones’ lack of playing time saw his brand value change very little as a result of his time in Russia.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£18m 398 395 -1% 420 (+6%)

 


Ashley Young – Manchester United – -1%

Young was one of few players on the plane with little to prove, having already done so on the biggest of stages with both England and Manchester United. Despite playing in five of England’s seven matches, there was little change in his brand value throughout the tournament.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£6.3m 406 402 -1% 437 (+8%)

Gary Cahill – Chelsea – -2%

Cahill was lucky to be on the plane to Russia, having struggled to hold down a place in Antonio Conte’s Chelsea side last season. That showed in Southgate’s selections. The Chelsea captain made just one appearance, in the 1-0 defeat to Belgium.

Cahill’s value has dropped slightly since England’s World Cup run came to an end, as his retirement from or phasing out of the England setup likely looms.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£13.5m 394 388 -2% 394 (0%)

Danny Rose – Tottenham Hotspur – -12%

Rose was unable to force himself into the starting lineup in Russia. He started just two of his five appearances, both against Belgium. He came on late against Panama, Colombia and Croatia, but was ultimately unable to make much of an impact.

Defeat to Croatia, followed by a disappointing showing in the third-place playoff, saw Rose’s value drop by 13% following the final game against Belgium.

Value Starting value Ending value Increase (+/-) Peak value
£27m 157 138 -12% 181 (+15%)

Danny Rose value - Verdict