3 THINGS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD TODAY

Good morning, here’s your Wednesday morning briefing to set you up for the day ahead. Look out for these three things happening around the world today.

UK court set to hear Julian Assange case

A court hearing for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is scheduled to take place today as the United States continues to push for his extradition to face charges over the leaking of confidential US government documents.

It is unclear whether Assange, who was unable to appear at an earlier hearing due to poor health, will be fit to attend today. Chief magistrate Emma Arbuthnot previously suggested that today’s hearing could take place at the Belmarsh Prison where Assange is serving a 50-week sentence over his seven year stay in the Ecuadorian embassy.

The US Justice Department submitted a formal extradition request to the UK last week. Assange “denied his consent” to a previous request last month, stating: “I do not wish to surrender myself for extradition for doing journalism that has won many awards and protected many people.”

World’s largest AI event for business gets underway

The AI Summit, billed as the world’s largest artificial intelligence event for business, will get underway today, which promises to help businesses to enter the “4th industrial revolution”.

The event will feature more than 300 expert speakers from tech giants including Microsoft, Facebook, IBM, and Google. Keynote speakers include British Airways CEO Alex Cruz, HSBC CEO John Flint and Facebook Vice President Nicola Medelsohn, who will cover everything from technical skills to business strategy, providing attendees with “the knowledge, tools and experience you need to change the face of your business for good”.

The AI Summit is taking place at the London ExCeL exhibition centre over the next two days.

SpaceX launches Canada’s RADARSAT satellite constellation

Elon Musk’s SpaceX will today launch the Canadian Space Agency’s RADARSTAR satellite constellation on board one of its Falcon 9 rockets.

The Earth observation satellites will offer a range of uses for various Canadian government departments, who will rely on the data gathered by RADARSAT to provide key services to Canadian citizens, such as monitoring surrounding waters, detecting natural disasters, and monitoring ecosystems for change.

The launch is scheduled to take place at the Vanderberg Air Force Base in California, United States, at 7:17am local time (3:17pm London time).

Tuesday’s Highlights

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“No smoking gun” but Huawei security threat too great to ignore, warns report

3 Things That Will Change the World Today

Slave to the algorithm: why now is the time to reboot the gig economy

Ericsson updates 5G predictions after “rapid early momentum and enthusiasm”