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June 21, 2019updated 20 Jun 2019 4:43pm

Huawei braces for disappointing Honor 20 Europe sales / NAO publish data usage report / High-tech African Cup of Nations kicks off

By Luke Christou

3 THINGS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD TODAY

Good morning, here’s your Friday morning briefing to set you up for the day ahead. Look out for these three things happening around the world today.

Huawei braces for disappointing Honor 20 Europe sales

Chinese telecommunication company Huawei will begin selling its latest flagship Honor smartphone in the European market today, with the company expecting poor sales as a result of the United States’ calls to ditch Huawei technology.

Huawei executives will reportedly monitor sales of the Honor 20 and Honor 20 Pro devices and may decide to pull the device from Europe should it fail to sale. That seems somewhat likely, with many European carriers having already decided against offering it to their customers.

The US has called on foreign nations to ban Huawei over fears that its technology could be used by the Chinese government to spy, which Huawei strongly denies.

While it is only the US that has blacklisted Huawei, the firm reported that it expects international smartphone shipments to drop by around 40% as a result of the dispute.

NAO publishes government data usage report

The United Kingdom’s National Audit Office (NAO) will today publish its report examining how the Government uses data to implement new policies and reform public services.

According to the report, the Government does not see the data as a priority, with many departments still reliant on poor data.

The report will recommend that the Cabinet Office and Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) use the 2020 data strategy to identify good data practices and address the barriers holding it back.

Data has the potential to improve public services, cut costs and improve efficiency. However, just 28% of organisations in the public sector believe that their employees are adequately trained to find value in their data.

High-tech African Cup of Nations kicks off

The 2019 African Cup of Nations, Africa’s premier international football tournament, will get underway today with host nation Egypt set to take on Zimbabwe.

The biennial tournament’s hosts have turned to technology in a bid to beat ticketing issues and crowd troubles. Thanks to a partnership with ticket marketplace Tazkarti to launch a secure booking website, stewards will be able to match each ticket with each fan when they enter the stadium in order to deter gatecrashers.

Special devices will also be used to detect prohibited items such as fireworks and flares if they’re brought into host stadiums, while drones will be used to monitor and identify fans in the stadium, allowing security officials to track down individuals should an issue arise.

Thursday’s Highlights

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