3 THINGS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD TODAY

Good morning, here’s your Monday morning briefing. Look out for these three things happening around the world today.

G7 leaders hold emergency COVID-19 videoconference

World leaders from the G7 – which includes the US, UK, Germany, Japan, Italy, France and Canada – today hold a virtual meeting to discuss and coordinate their response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The videoconference was announced by French President Emmanuel Macron on Friday. As part of the announcement, a French official said that France was seeking a coordinated approach over the control of borders.

This morning Germany closed its borders with neighbouring countries in a bid to contain the virus, an apparent U-turn from last week. It follows similar border closures by Denmark, Poland and the Czech Republic.

Vaccine research, treatment and economic responses will all be up for discussion in today’s G7 videoconference.

UK government begins daily coronavirus briefing

Today UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson holds a press briefing on the coronavirus in what will become a daily occurrence during the outbreak.

Downing Street announced last night that Johnson, alongside Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty and Chief Scientific Adviser Patrick Vallance, will make daily appearances in a bid to keep “the public informed every step of the way about what we’re doing to fight the spread of coronavirus, when we’re doing it and why we’re doing it”.

The government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has come under criticism from some, who have called for “more restrictive measures” to contain the virus.

In the afternoon Johnson will chair another COBRA meeting to coordinate the government’s ongoing response, which is “expected to include discussion on current modelling of the outbreak and next steps on plans around shielding elderly and vulnerable people, household isolation and mass gatherings”.

Andrew Bailey’s first day as Governor of the Bank of England

Andrew Bailey begins his first day as Governor of the Bank of England as the coronavirus outbreak continues to wreak economic havoc.

Bailey, who replaces Mark Carney, was previously the head of the Financial Conduct Authority.

He faces the immediate task of reassuring markets during the worst economic crisis since the 2008 financial crash, with a coronavirus triggered recession firmly on the cards.

The State of Technology This Week

Bailey is no stranger to turmoil, having helped oversee the 2008 bailout of the financial sector when responsible for the bank’s special operations. He also began his tenure as head of the FCA just a week after the Brexit vote shook financial markets.

Friday’s Highlights

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Coronavirus: Bolt to suspend accounts of affected drivers

“Too late”: Cyberspace Solarium Commission report paints dark picture of US ravaged by cyberattacks

Companies offering free remote working tools to help with the coronavirus