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April 5, 2019updated 04 Apr 2019 3:44pm

South Korea launches 5G network / Trump visits US-Mexico border / Hayabusa2 collects early-space sample

By Luke Christou

3 THINGS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD TODAY

Good morning, here’s your Friday morning briefing to set you up for the day ahead. Look out for these three things happening around the world today.

South Korea launches 5G network

South Korea is today expected to launch the world’s first full-fledged 5G mobile service, following a test release in the Seoul metropolitan area earlier this week.

According to the Financial Times, South Korea has pushed its launch forward to ensure that it becomes the first country to offer nationwide commercial 5G services after Verizon began testing its 5G services in two US cities on Wednesday.

The launch will coincide with the launch of the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G smartphone in South Korea, which will be the company’s first device compatible with next-generation mobile networks.

Trump visits US-Mexico border

President of the United States Donald Trump will visit the US-Mexico border today following his recent threats to close the border in a bid to stop illegal immigration into the US.

Trump will inspect a portion of the 30ft-high border fence in Calexico, California, which has recently been replaced.

Calexico’s border crossing sees more than seven million people legally cross between the two countries each year, with residents warning that closing the crossing could lead to severe labour shortages and detrimental economic issues for the town.

Technological solutions, such as drones, have previously been suggested as a way to crack down on illegal immigration into the US. However, Trump has insisted that “they’re not gonna stop the problems that this country has”.

Hayabusa2 collects early-space sample

The Hayabusa2 spacecraft, launched by Japanese space agency JAXA in 2014, is scheduled to collect samples from the Ryugu asteroid that it has been sent to study today.

It is hoped that that the mission will provide valuable knowledge of carbon-rich asteroids like Ryugu and the role they played in the creation of life on Earth. Scientists believe that asteroids like Ryugu may have transported both water and organic material to Earth that were vital to the early development of life on the planet.

Hayabusa2 will drop an explosive device onto the asteroid to create a crater, which will allow the spacecraft to collect subsurface materials that are thought to contain significant amounts of water.

These samples will be transported back to Earth, with Hayabusa2 set to return in 2020.

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