The Pinter, a device that enables consumers to brew fresh beer from their kitchens, has today launched in the UK amid an ongoing shift away from pub drinking.

Developed by The Greater Good Fresh Brewing Co, the Pinter is a keg-shaped device in which consumers can brew a range of beers and ciders in under a week.

This is achieved using the accompanying Pinter Packs, which are designed to fit in a letter box, and contain brewing yeast, purifier and fresh press, a liquid containing malt, hops or fruit. Consumers add tap water, with each pack producing 10 pints of beer or cider.

The drinks take two to five days to brew, before consumers place the Pinter into their fridge to allow them to condition for two days.

A Pinter costs £75, including two Pinter Packs, with additional packs costing £12 each. The company also offers a monthly subscription.

“The Pinter has taken us years to develop, as the pioneers of Fresh Beer our ambition is no less than to change the way people drink,” said Ralph Broadbent, CEO of The Greater Good Fresh Brewing Co.

“With the Pinter we’re going to deliver a new world of fresh beer into people’s homes. Everyone would drink brewery fresh beer if they could, the Pinter now means they can.”

The Pinter launches amid at-home drinking rise

The Pinter was originally created through a Kickstarter campaign, through which it raised £55,000. However, its launch has come at a smart time.

Despite the reopening of pubs, many consumers are still opting to drink at home, while sales of alcoholic drinks for at-home consumption rose significantly during lockdown.

Meanwhile, the Pinter also taps into a number of other trends prompted by Covid-19.

As of June, sales of home brewing kits had risen by almost 500%, with consumers having more free time on their hands and a desire to save money.

Sustainability has also been an area of growing interest for consumers, and the Pinter here also makes a strong case, with 70% less packaging and 50% less CO2 than for an equivalent number of bottled beers.


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