These three things will change the world today.

1. Brexit bill published

Later this morning, British prime minister Theresa May will publish a bill enabling the government to start the Brexit process.

The legislation will be put before MPs after the Supreme Court ruled that the government could not trigger article 50 — the official EU exit clause — without parliament’s consent.

The bill will be “straightforward,” according to Brexit secretary David Davis.

Brexit shadow minister Jenny Chapman challenged Davis, asking whether the white paper will be “a cut and paste” of the prime minister’s speech last week.

May is hoping to trigger Article 50 by the end of March.

2. Almost midnight on the Doomsday Clock

The Doomsday Clock may move closer to midnight later today amid increasingly tense relations between world powers. The symbolic clock, was created in 1947, as a metaphor for pending disaster.

At that time, the prospect of nuclear war between the US and the former Soviet Union was not out outside the realms of possibility.

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, an independent nonprofit US-based organisation is expected to move The Doomsday Clock forward by one minute today.

This will move the clock the closest it has ever been to the so-called apocalypse since 1953, when the US took the decision to upgrade its nuclear arsenal with the hydrogen bomb.

“Factors influencing the 2017 deliberations regarding any adjustment that may be made to the Doomsday Clock include: a rise in strident nationalism worldwide, president Donald Trump’s comments on nuclear arms and climate issues, a darkening global security landscape that is coloured by increasingly sophisticated technology, and a growing disregard for scientific expertise,” the scientists said in a statement.

Is the end near?

3 Things That Will Change the World Today

3. Tim Peake will go back to space

Earlier today, British astronaut Tim Peake announced he would be making a second mission into space.

The news comes as the spacecraft that carried Tim Peake to and from the International Space Station last year went on display at London’s Science Museum.

“Tim Peake’s Principia mission inspired a generation, and showed just how far science can take you,” said business secretary Greg Clark.

The timing of Peake’s next mission will be decided by the European Space Agency (Esa).