As MPs and political commentators discussed today’s events outside parliament, they were at times drowned out by protestors calling for a People’s Vote.

This call was also echoed by many MPs, including Liberal Democrat Leader and MP for Twickenham Vince Cable.

“If Theresa May is still struggling to get this deal past her own cabinet in No. 10, how will it win support in Parliament or the country?” he asked on Twitter.

“There’s a sensible way out of this mess: go back to the country for a People’s Vote.”

“After days of chaos, a clear majority of the public back a People’s Vote, which now has a 20 point lead. Parliament is gridlocked, and the only way to break the impasse is to put the issue back to the people,” agreed Labour MP for Streatham Chuka Umunna.

Public backs People’s Vote

The latest polls also show support for a People’s Vote following the announcement of a Brexit deal.

A YouGov poll of 1,153 British people taken overnight found that 48% now back a People’s Vote, compared to just 34% against.

The poll also found that 54% would vote for Remain.

Others are now saying that they believe another referendum is now on the cards.

“I think we need a Labour government and we need to focus, for once, on the issues facing the country rather than this Brexit mess, but there can’t be a general election unless Conservative MPs vote for one, and they’re not going to,” Labour MP Ben Bradshaw told the BBC.

“So I think the most likely outcome will be that there’s another referendum – that is another opportunity.”

IMF warns of “disorderly Brexit”

However, while many are keen on the idea of a People’s vote, those outside the UK are suggesting it would be problematic for the country.

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Gerry Rice, a spokesman for the International Monetary Fund, warned that a “disorderly Brexit would be the biggest risk to the outlook of the UK” in a news conference in Washington.

“We encourage both parties to continue their efforts to reach a timely agreement accompanied by an implementation period to avoid a cliff-edge and to allow firms and workers sufficient time to adjust to the new relationship.”