3 THINGS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD TODAY

Good morning, here’s your Wednesday morning briefing to set you up for the day ahead. Look out for these three things happening around the world today.

US considers how to combat Russian disinformation

The US Government will today hear from key witnesses on the ongoing issue of Russian disinformation.

The hearing, entitled United States Efforts to Counter Russian Disinformation and Malign Influence, will be held by the Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs.

Witnesses include John F Lansing, CEO of the United States Agency for Global Media; Lea Gabrielle, Special Envoy and Coordinator of the Global Engagement Center, US Department of State and Alina Polyakova, founding director of the Project on Global Democracy and Emerging Technology and fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution.

The hearing comes as Russia is increasingly being accused of using bots and troll farms to undermine faith in Western democracy on social media.

UK faces digital momentum criticism

The UK Government will today face the findings of a scathing report that is raising the alarm over its digital agenda.

The report, produced by MPs from the Science and Technology Committee, has found that the government’s digital agenda is lacking, and that digital momentum has slowed significantly with the country dropping behind others in international rankings.

This, the report finds, has been particularly notable since the departure of Francis Maude, who was Minister of State for Trade and Investment until 2016, and a number of senior members of the civil service.

It urges the UK to introduce ministers in charge of championing the UK’s digital efforts in every department by the end of this year.

The report comes as the UK is increasingly looking to technology to help grow its economy following Brexit.

Pioneering cybersecurity efforts on show for first time

The Science Museum’s latest exhibit, Top Secret: From Ciphers to Cyber Security, will open today, allowing members of the public to view previously unseen artefacts for the first time.

The exhibition, which has been developed with assistance from GCHQ, includes declassified files and artefacts from the security agency, providing insight into how the organisation’s cryptographic and cybersecurity efforts have evolved over time.

3 Things That Will Change the World Today

It includes key details about Alan Turing and his colleagues’ efforts to break the Enigma code in 1941, as well as information about Cold War-era espionage projects.

Timed to coincide with the 100th anniversary of GCHQ, it runs from today until 23 February 2020 at London’s Science Museum.

Tuesday’s Highlights

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Uber’s plan is to become the AWS of logistics: Uber CTO

Cryptocurrencies key to post-Brexit economy: deVere CEO

Gauging the long-term impacts of augmented and virtual reality