3 THINGS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD TODAY

Good morning, here’s your Monday morning briefing to set you up for the day ahead. Look out for these three things happening around the world today.

Nissan CEO stands down over pay scandal

Hiroto Saikawa, the CEO of car manufacturer Nissan, will step down today after admitting that he had been overpaid as part of a compensation scheme.

Saikawa denies any wrongdoing and has offered to pay back the money, but has willingly agreed to resign following a board meeting earlier this week, with current COO Yasuhiro Yamauchi set to take his place.

The scandal involving Saikawa follows the case of former Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn, who was arrested last year on charges of financial misconduct for allegedly misreporting his earnings by as much as five billion yen ($44m) in Tokyo stock exchange filings.

Huawei launches latest flagship smartphone

Huawei is set to launch its latest flagship smartphone in Munich, Germany, today, as revealed by a teaser video posted on social media platform Twitter.

The Huawei Mate 30 and Mate 30 Pro are both set to feature Huawei’s waterfall screen technology. Rather than having a slight curve, like Samsung’s Galaxy Edge, the Mate 30 will feature 90 degree curves on both sides.

The new handsets are also expected to house Huawei’s next-generation facial recognition technology, as well as improved cameras.

Happy Preservation of the Ozone Layer Day

Today marks the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer, an event launched by United Nations to celebrate the successful global efforts to address climate change and protect the ozone layer from further damage.

This year will focus on the impact of the Montreal Protocol, a treaty designed to protect the ozone layer by reducing the production of ozone-depleting substances. According to the UN, the Montreal Protocol has seen 99% of ozone-depleting chemicals in refrigerators, air conditioners and other products phased out.

The day will also be used to generate support for the Kigali Amendment, which was added to the Montreal Protocol at the start of the year. The Kigali Amendment sets the target of phasing out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which are commonly used as a replacement for the chemicals that the Montreal Protocol aims to reduce, yet still cause damage to the ozone layer.

Friday’s Highlights

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VR harassment: Government urged to publish guidelines to protect users

3 Things That Will Change the World Today

Element AI nets £123m to advance enterprise artificial intelligence

Inside HPE’s Technology Renewal Centre, its base in the war on e-waste