These three things are going to have a significant impact on the wider world.

1. Theresa May’s Brexit speech

British prime minister Theresa May will today set out how she intends to take Britain out of the European Union.

“We seek a new and equal partnership — between an independent, self-governing, global Britain and our friends and allies in the EU,” she will say In the landmark speech today in London.

“Not partial membership of the European Union, associate membership of the European Union, or anything that leaves us half-in, half-out. We do not seek to adopt a model already enjoyed by other countries. We do not seek to hold on to bits of membership as we leave. The United Kingdom is leaving the European Union. My job is to get the right deal for Britain as we do.”

As part of her 12 negotiating principles, May will make clear that Britain will no longer remain part of the single market for the first time. Abolishing the European Court of Justice’s role in British courts and ending unlimited EU immigration will also be key priorities. It is likely that Britain will introduce a work permit scheme for EU workers alongside new automated security checks for EU visitors.

May’s approach to Britain’s role in the customs union is less certain, although foreign secretary Boris Johnson has emphasised the need for a “clean Brexit.”

2. WEF 2017: China’s president champions globalisation

Xi Jinping, the first Chinese president in history to attend the World Economic Forum (WEF) will defend globalisation in his speech at the WEF today at the Swiss mountain resort.

With US president-elect Donald Trump threatening to place limits on trade with China, Jinping will make clear that the second biggest economy in the world will continue to exert influence on the global stage.

“It is no coincidence that Xi chose this year to make the trip up the magic mountain,” said Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group, a US-based political risk consultancy.

Trump, who will be sworn in as the 45th US president on Friday has labelled China a “currency manipulator” and blamed the country for US job losses.

3. Facebook on the defence

Facebook chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg will defend his company against allegations that his company stole virtual reality (VR) technology. Zenimax Media, owner of renowned games studio id Software, is suing Facebook for $2bn for copying  one of their headsets. Oculus, bought by Facebook in 2014, is accused of violating copyright law.

“Oculus and its founders have invested a wealth of time and money in VR because we believe it can fundamentally transform the way people interact and communicate,” a spokesman for Oculus told the BBC.

“We’re disappointed that another company is using wasteful litigation to attempt to take credit for technology that it did not have the vision, expertise, or patience to build.”

The case will be heard in a Dallas court today.