July 17, 2020

Cambridge Quantum Computing joins IBM Q Network

By Ellen Daniel

Independent quantum computing company Cambridge Quantum Computing (CQC) has become the first hub to join the IBM Q Network.

The partnership will mean that CQC’s clients can access IBM’s quantum systems and resources through the IBM Quantum Computation Center.

IBM Quantum Computation Center includes 20 of the most-advanced quantum computers commercially available, which CQC members will use for “chemistry, optimisation, finance, and quantum machine learning and natural language processing”. This includes eight systems with a Quantum Volume of 32, and a 53-qubit system.

CQC is a leader in quantum software and quantum algorithms and helps its clients benefit from the rapidly changing quantum computing hardware available. It is hoped that the partnership with IBM will improve organisations’ access to quantum computing.

IBM is one of the leaders in quantum computing. It launched IBM Quantum as an initiative to build the first commercial universal quantum computing systems.

“To accelerate progress toward the first commercial applications, we must make it easier for corporations to get started working with the most advanced quantum computers, supported by quantum application experts working closely with them,” said Dr Anthony Annunziata, director of the IBM Q Network.

“By partnering with CQC to create the first startup-based hub, researchers and application developers in enterprises will be able to develop the skills, expertise and use case-specific approaches that will be essential to harness the capability of quantum for business advantage in the coming years.”

The UK government has set out its intentions to make the UK  “a world-leader in quantum science and technologies”, with a £1bn investment from government and industry. Last month it announced 38 new quantum computing projects that will receive £70 million government investment as part of Quantum Tech Digital Week.

The projects will focus on a range of global challenges including developing electric car batteries, energy storage systems and diagnosing cancerous tumours.


Read more: Quantum random number generators project nets £2.8m government funding.