This year there has been a lot of discussion around gender equality and to cap it off advertising agency Grey London has collaborated with Goldstein music to launch an album of much-loved Christmas hymns, rewritten to promote feminist messages.

The album is titled Hyrrs: Festive Hymns Made Feminist and uses well-known songs to highlight issues of slut-shaming, the gender pay gap, harassment, and other forms of sexism.

They are partially intended to raise awareness of continued examples of inequality and partially to refute the stereotype that feminists can’t take a joke.

Sandra Horley, chief executive of women’s charity Refuge, said:

The Hyrrs of the world are often accused of lacking a sense of humour. So, this is a divine opportunity for the Hymns of the world to see the funny side. Otherwise, guess who has the last laugh?

On its site the album comes with the tag line “It’s 2017. We don’t need more hymns. We need more hyrrs.”

It describes itself as:

Festive hymns made feminist — our holly-jolly eff you to the gender inequality we’ve seen in 2017. Help us stick it to sexism.

The songs include classics such as Deck the Halls, In the Bleak midwinter and God Rest ye Merry Gentlemen — reworded into Kick the balls (of patriarchy), Female Sexual PleasureΒ and We Want an Equal SalaryΒ respectively.

Memorable lines include:

🎡 Female sexual pleasure is too oft’ ignored, men who bang are heroes, women are called whoresβ€Β πŸŽΆ

and

3 Things That Will Change the World Today

🎢Good Queen Wenceslas looked out, on the feast of Stephen. Then she thought “Now, hang about, why’s this feast called Stephen?🎡

Grey’s co-chief creative office Vicki Maguire said:

From Weinstein and Westminster to salaries and sexism, 2017 has shown how appalling it can be for women. That’s why we now want to make a statement about kicking everyday inequality in the baubles this Christmas, while raising money for an amazing cause.

The money raised by the album will go to UK based women’s charity Refuge, which provides life-saving services to those affected by domestic abuse, such as the National Domestic Violence Helpline.

Domestic violence affects one in four women in the UK. In the US there are 20,000 phone calls placed to domestic violence hotlines every day.