3 THINGS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD TODAY

Good morning, here’s your Friday morning briefing to set you up for the day ahead. Look out for these three things happening around the world today.

Facebook offers helping hand on World Blood Donor Day

Today marks World Blood Donor Day, founded by the World Health Organization (WHO) to raise awareness of the need for life-saving blood donations.

The blood donations campaign, which is now in its 15th year, has been boosted by social media platform Facebook this year, after the website launched a new feature yesterday designed to encourage its users to respond to requests for blood from organisations across the United States, such as the American Red Cross and Inova.

A similar feature already exists in countries such as Bangladesh, Brazil, India and Pakistan.

Given Facebook’s global reach – the platform currently counts more than a quarter of the world’s population among its monthly active user base – it could be a valuable tool in helping the WHO reach its goal of universal access to safe blood transfusion.

CNSC 2019 considers advantage of high-tech

Think tank The Center for a New American Security will host the National Security Conference today, where experts and educators in politics, security and technology will come together to discuss the future of security in the United States.

Technology will be a running theme throughout the event, with talks on subjects such as maintaining the US’s position as a leader in artificial intelligence, threats posed by new financial technologies, and China’s growing strength in the technology industry.

Attendees will hear from speakers from organisations including PayPal, OpenAI, Human Rights Watch and the United States government.

The CNAS National Security Conference is being held at the Hilton Washington Hotel in Washington DC, starting at 9:30am local time (2:30pm London time).

Christchurch attack suspect appears in court

Australian Brenton Tarrant will appear in court today charged with 51 counts of murder and 40 counts of attempted murder following the March attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

The attack, which was live-streamed by the attacker through Facebook, saw internet platforms such as Facebook and YouTube come under fire for failing to remove footage that potentially exposes users to harmful content.

A white paper published by the UK government in the wake of the attack called for online platforms to take responsibility for illegal content, terrorist propaganda, child sex abuse and cyberbullying that takes place on their platforms. Failure to do so could result in substantial fines or a ban.

3 Things That Will Change the World Today

Thursday’s Highlights

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How Leatherhead FC is using IBM’s AI to up their game

Avoiding turbulence on your way to the cloud

Uber Air unveils Skyport designs for proposed air taxi service