3 THINGS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD TODAY

Good morning, here’s your Friday morning briefing to set you up for the day ahead. Look out for these three things happening around the world today.

Report on gig economy workers after Brexit published

The Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) today publishes a report looking at the impact that issues such as Brexit, automation and a recession are likely to have on different parts of the workforce.

The report concludes that gig economy workers are most at risk, due to the lack of guarantees that they are offered by their employers.

Gig economy employment refers to the short-term employment of independent contractors. These positions are becoming increasingly common with the rise of technology companies such as Uber.

The RSA has called for the government to deploy a ‘21st century safety net’ to offer these workers some protection.

Uber holds Tech for Safety Summit

Ride-hailing app Uber will today hold the Tech for Safety Summit in Johannesburg, bringing together leaders from across South Africa’s tech industry to discuss the safety challenges that the country faces, and how technology can play a part in addressing them.

The event, which will be opened by Uber’s Global Senior Director of Product, Sachin Kansal, will include panels on tech for community safety, tech for road safety, and tech for start-up safety. 

The event will feature a keynote from South Africa’s Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies, Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams, as well as guest speakers from tech giants such as Facebook and Microsoft.

Uber’s Tech for Safety Summit is taking place at Hyde Park in Johannesburg, starting at 9am local time (8am London time).

Poland concludes cybersecurity strategy consultation

A consultation period for Poland’s  new cybersecurity strategy comes to an end today, as the Polish government looks to set out its plans to protect the country from digital threats for the next five years.

Drafted by the Ministry of Digitisation, the strategy will cover the period between 2019 to 2024, and aims to strengthen Poland’s position in the cybersecurity field. The strategy will encourage more public-private and cross-border cooperation.

This follows the European Union’s tough response to growing cybersecurity threats. The bloc introduced the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) last year, which allows harsh penalties to be handed to companies involved in a data breach, and has also developed an EU cybersecurity certification framework for digital products and services.

3 Things That Will Change the World Today

Thursday’s Highlights

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Suprema data breach: What GDPR says about biometrics

Digital personal assistants are here, so why aren’t enterprises using them?

Electric car charging points surpass petrol stations for first time